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How to perform TCP PING with IP address and port

In this article learn how to perform TCP PING with IP address and port, or to make it simple – ping over a tcp connection.

Everybody probably heard of this little and great command line utility that is used to test the reachability of a host on an Internet Protocol (IP) network.

But maybe you didn’t know that it works with ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol). ICMP was designed to provide network connectivity information to administrators and applications.

However, today you can find a number of examples where a firewall on a remote host has blocked ICMP traffic towards it! One of the examples is that the default setting in Windows Server 2012 is to not respond to ping!

So if you can’t ping a server, that doesn’t mean that it has connectivity issues – perhaps it is just blocking ICMP connections. In this kind of a situation, try performing a TCP ping check to that server.

Integrated Windows ping command line utility can’t ping over a TCP connection. For that reason, we must use an alternative utility to perform TCP PING with IP address and port like tcping.exeping over a tcp connection:

tcping creative blog ping over tcp protocol

Another alternative to standard Windows ping utility is PsPing; and here is the real example from practice:

ICMP ping vs TCP ping

So, don’t make rely just on default Windows ping tool (left command prompt), it may be misleading. The TCP ping in the right command prompt shows us that this computer is alive 🙂

You can even try this online tool to perform TCP PING with IP address and port:

online TCP ping tool

When I clicked on the Ping it! button, those were the results:

TCP ping web gui frontend

Note that for all tests I used port 80, which is a standard HTTP port. You can try any other port, but if that remote computer has the Internet connection, it’s good choice to try port 80.

But hey, can I use port 80 with integrated Windows ping utility? No, you can not: ICMP doesn’t have ports. You can’t actually ping a port (at least not with the standard ping tool). Or, more accurately, when someone speaks of “pinging a port” they are actually referring to using a layer 4 protocol (such as TCP or UDP) to see if a port is open. Always remember that the original, “real ping” uses ICMP, which doesn’t use ports at all (ICMP works at layer 3).

Other great tool for TCP pinging is hping.

But I really like PsPing (I integrated it with alternative command prompt), which is part of a Sysinternals’ command-line kit that aids in the system administration – named PsTools. Besides TCP ping, you can measure latency and TCP bandwidth with it. When it comes to measuring bandwidth, also check iperf command line utility.

At the bottom line, instead of checking the cableschecking your hardware, trying another drivers, troubleshooting network connectivity up front, better try TCP ping.

If you still want to use standard ping instead, configure your hardware firewall and/or security software and/or Windows firewall policies to allow ICMP connections.

 

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Summary
How to perform TCP PING with IP address and port
Article Name
How to perform TCP PING with IP address and port
Description
In this article learn how to perform TCP PING with IP address and port, or to make it simple - ping over a tcp connection.
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www.CreativForm.com